How to Prove Your Leadership Skills on Your Resume

How to Prove Your Leadership Skills on Your Resume

leader

It is usually fairly easy to showcase your qualifications and hard skills on a resume, but demonstrating your soft skills can be quite a challenge. This is especially true in the case of leadership skills: It’s easy to say you have them, but it’s much more difficult to prove you do.

Demonstrating your leadership skills is essential to landing many roles, especially those with supervisory or managerial duties. Here are five ways to craft a more convincing portrait of your leadership skills on your resume:

1. Explain the Structures of Your Previous Teams

Recruiters will not know the organizational structures of your previous employers or how your previous positions fit into them. A great way to quickly demonstrate your leadership skills is to explain where your position fell in the company hierarchy and the type of people you led in that position. You can make this information quantifiable by writing about the number of people on your team, the number of people in total, and how your work fed into the business.

Example: “Managed a team of 6 analysts, reporting directly to the managing director.”

2. Reference Your Delegation Skills

A good leader knows when to delegate and how to get the most out of their team members. Of course, when describing your delegation skills, be sure not to take attention away from your integral role in the project. Instead, your stories of delegation should showcase the fact that you were being an effective leader, not simply passing work off onto your subordinates. Keywords such as “empower,” “appoint,” “mobilize,” “engage,” and “connect” can show your delegation skills without taking the focus away from your own role as a leader.

Example: “Mobilized a team of 3 project managers to deliver 5 milestones, with a weekly reporting process for updates and issues.”

3. Talk About Leading From the Front

Sure, having leadership skills means being able to encourage your team members to give their all, but the best leaders make their own contributions as much as they delegate. Showcasing your ability to lead by example is a great way to provide evidence of your leadership skills.

Discuss past projects where you changed a process or encouraged others by the work you did yourself. Some keywords you may want to use in this context include “guide,” “coach,” “enable,” and “stimulate.”

Example: “Led a team with a sales revenue of $3 million, with myself personally contributing $550,000.”

4. Detail Your Team’s Achievements

An effective leader is one who can develop an effective team and inspire it to reach its goals. In light of this fact, detailing your team’s key achievements can be a good way to present your leadership skills in action. Structure mentions of your team achievements with first-person pronouns (“I” and “we”), and highlight what you did and what your team was able to achieve because of your actions.

Example: “By providing effective motivation and incentivization, I was able to increase team productivity by 15 percent.”

5. Describe How You Played a Key Role in Your Team’s Effectiveness

While showcasing your team’s achievements can help demonstrate your leadership skills, you have to be careful to emphasize your role in creating such an effective team. You don’t want recruiters to assume you were simply lucky enough to walk onto a highly effective team that already existed. It is important that your resume’s descriptions of your team keep the focus on your role in making it as effective as it was.

Example: “Rescued failing project that was behind schedule, ultimately allowing us to deliver it six weeks ahead of completion.”

If there is one key takeaway in all of this, it would be the following: When discussing your leadership skills in your resume, it is essential to keep the focus on yourself, your input, and your results. It can be difficult not to approach your achievements with a team-oriented mindset, but remember: Recruiters are hiring you, not your team.

Andrew Fennell is the founder of UK-based CV-writing advice website StandOut CV.

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My New Pet Peeve: Getting Personal on LinkedIn

rocks

Sometimes, you see something you just can’t unsee it. Unfortunately, that seems to be happening to me more and more on LinkedIn.

What was once a very professional website is now host to some very unprofessional things, and it’s frankly shocking. I’ve tried to push it out of my mind, but I just can’t any longer.

I’ve seen an influx of cartoon profile photos, as well as overly casual profile photos of people in baseball caps and other nonprofessional attire. I’m seeing a lot more profile photos with children and pets, too. Heck, I’ve even seen ultrasound photos and posts announcing the births of new babies!

It’s not just bad photos. There are job titles like “Not Channing Tatum’s Dad” and “Defender of the Universe.” Go ahead, do a quick search of your own. You’ll find at least 64 professionals on LinkedIn who are apparently in charge of defending our universe!

At first glance, these things may seem like harmless fun. In fact, you could argue this kind of behavior makes a person more relatable, allowing your LinkedIn connections to learn more about you as a multifaceted human being.

But this is the problem: Not everybody can post photos with their babies and cats on LinkedIn and be taken seriously in the professional world. Not everyone can post a cartoon profile photo and expect to get a new job.

I’ll be honest: The people primarily responsible for these posts and pictures are young male executives in their 30s and 40s. I’m 100 percent certain they have the best of intentions. They want to be funny and down to earth. They want to showcase their families, their lives, and their personalities.

Hear me out: What I’m describing may not seem so bad to you, but understand that certain people don’t have the luxury of revealing all this information about themselves if they want to be employed.

For example, I could never post a photo with children and expect to land a job interview. In fact, I have been directly asked in job interviews whether or not I was planning to have children soon. It’s not right — and it’s certainly illegal — but this question is sometimes used to screen out certain candidates. In fact, employers often use personal information about candidates to filter them from the running. Again: It’s not right, but it definitely happens.

To the young, successful men out there: I respect what you’re trying to do. I respect that you want to be relatable. I love that you’re showing me your family is an important part of your life. I know you are creating these fun profiles with the best intentions.

But we can’t all share those things and be taken seriously. Some of us don’t have the privilege, simply because of our demographics. In light of that fact, I think it’s best we keep LinkedIn as the professional site it was meant to be. When we become friends, we can connect on Facebook and learn all about your kids, your spouse, and your awesome dogs.

Apply the Genius Habit to Your Job Search

genius

Being able to navigate a job search seamlessly is imperative in the changing landscape of work. While a job search can be intimidating, you need to get used to the idea because you will have to go through the job interview process many times over the course of your career. Gone are the days when most people stayed with the same company — or even the same industry — for their entire careers.

To find the right new job, you need to become a job search ninja. A job search ninja is fearless about the prospect of navigating a change and confident in their value. If it’s clear that things aren’t ideal in your current role, start the job search with excitement and a plan. The less fear you have about changing jobs, the more powerful you will be in terms of guiding your career toward your vision and in the direction you want to go.

I’ve met many people who avoid the job search entirely. They stay in jobs they don’t like because they are overwhelmed at the prospect of searching for new ones. They simply don’t know where to begin and don’t understand the process, especially regarding the ever-evolving ways that technology and social media have changed recruiting. These people are unprepared to face the rejections that invariably come or the arduousness of identifying the right targets. They also lack clarity on how to speak about themselves, what value they bring, and what they are looking for.

Once you know your “Zone of Genius,” there will be infinite possibilities for you to explore, but sometimes the infinite possibilities are what make finding a job so daunting. The job search is an area in which you can use your genius and your purpose to narrow down your search. Start with organizations or types of work that are meaningful to you. Is there an opportunity for you to impact directly another person who is aligned with your purpose? Is the company delivering or creating a product or helping people in a way that’s connected to your purpose? If not, keep looking.

GeniusOnce you have identified areas of work or companies that may be a good fit for your purpose, look at the specific jobs and potential roles that could use your genius. Use the kind of thinking and problem-solving that you’re best at and compare your genius to the job opportunities. When you land the interview, you can find out more information about how often you would be able to use your genius on a day-to-day basis. If the job has no opportunity for you to use your genius, it’s not the right job for you.

Lastly, try to get a sense of the culture at every company you interview with. A sense of connection with the person you would be reporting to is a great place to start in terms of figuring out whether you would be a good fit for the team. Many people take jobs they think will look good on their resumes, or they have waited so long to start looking for new opportunities that they are burned out on their current jobs and take the first offers that come along. However, if you are so desperate to leave your old job that you don’t take the time to vet properly the new company and manager, you will likely end up right back where you started: unhappy and looking for a way out.

Have faith that the right opportunity will come your way, and until then, dig into the process and do a lot of work. I have clients who come to me in despair saying they left their previous positions and can’t find jobs. Then, I find out they’re only reaching out to two or three companies a week when they should be targeting 10, 15, or 20. If you’re not working, a job search should be your full-time job. If you’re still employed, expect to do less job hunting each day and recognize the process will take more time.

If your job search is taking longer than you expected, get curious. There are probably areas of the interview process in which you can improve, such as how you’re presenting yourself or how thoroughly you’re interviewing a potential employer. Use your search to build grit, and never give up. There are endless opportunities. If you embrace the process as an adventure rather than a chore and become skilled at speaking about yourself, you will end up finding opportunities that you never thought existed.

Excerpted from The Genius Habit: How One Habit Can Radically Change Your Work and Your Life (Sourcebooks 2019) by Laura Garnett.

Laura Garnett is a performance strategist, TEDx speaker, founder of Garnett Consulting, and the creator of the Genius Habit.

Master the art of closing deals and making placements. Take our Recruiter Certification Program today. We’re SHRM certified. Learn at your own pace during this 12-week program. Access over 20 courses. Great for those who want to break into recruiting, or recruiters who want to further their career.
Like this article? We also offer tons of free eBooks on career and recruiting topics – check out Get a Better Job the Right Way and Why It Matters Who Does Your Recruiting.

5 Easy Ways Stand Out to Employers

building

Last summer, Geoffrey Owens, once a regular on the legendary Cosby Show, was seen working a — *gulp* — regular job at Trader Joe’s. The press quickly ran with the story, and people around the world began making negative comments about Owens’s situation. Owens ended up quitting his job because of all the unwanted attention.

However, there was a silver lining in all of this: Tyler Perry invited Owens to join the cast of his show, The Haves and the Have Nots.

Think about this: Press coverage put Owens’s name out there, and while there was a little turbulence at first, that coverage also led to a new job for Owens.

There’s a lesson here for every job seeker. Today’s job search is all about making yourself seen. If employers know who you are and what you can do, they’ll turn to you when they need someone with your skills.

So few job seekers use all the tools available at their fingertips to stand out. While different searches will require different strategies, there are a few easy steps almost anyone can take to maximize their visibility:

1. Showcase Your Personality on Social Media

As I always say, employers can’t train great personalities — they have to hire them. Why not spice up your public social media profile pages with exciting cover art and other details that showcase who you are as a person? Instead of coming across as a generic job seeker, personalize your profile and give people a reason to stay on your page a little longer. Tell a story about yourself — a sincere, personal story. Help employers see you as more than just another candidate.

2. Create a Facebook or Instagram Business Page for Your Job Search

Employers want to see your personal Facebook page because it tells them a lot about who you are, but your privacy settings say, “No way!”

No problem: You can create a public business page for yourself instead. This can be dedicated to your professional journey while keeping your personal page personal. Use your business page to share your professional musings and post content that delivers value to your readers and potential employers.

You can also use your business pages to run ads to better target employers on these platforms. Master entrepreneur Gary Vaynerchuk swears by Instagram ads for brands. Why shouldn’t you try a similar strategy to increase your own visibility?

3. Start a Blog

While a social media page can be a good supplement, your professional presence should really have its own headquarters on the web. A blog hosted on WordPress or a similar service is a great way to do this.

With your own dedicated site, you can control the positive professional narrative about your abilities, explore ideas, take your readers on your journey, and tell great stories about your achievements. At a basic level, a WordPress site costs less than $50 a year to maintain. That’s a small price to pay for a robust, multimedia professional portfolio.

4. Host a Local Radio Show

Does your community have a local radio station? Ask if you can host a weekly show.

Many cities have local stations that encourage community members to participate in content creation. Go ahead and get involved! You can use your show to interview employers and entrepreneurs, chat with industry experts, and answer questions from listeners. Not only will you create a valuable resource for your community, but you’ll also build a powerful channel for reaching potential employers.

5. Volunteer

Charity work is a great way to hone specific skills that can help you land your next job, even if you’re currently employed. If you’re not employed, it’s also a great way to gain additional experience and fill the gaps in your resume.

Additionally, Antonio Boyd, CEO and president of The Think Tank Consulting Group, once told me that volunteering also enhances your understanding of people. This boosts your soft skills and makes you a better team player.

Finally, volunteering can also connect you with organizations you want to work for. By working with a nonprofit, you can meet local employers who support that nonprofit’s mission. These connections can be leveraged into job opportunities once you’ve demonstrated your value through your volunteer work.

When you’re building a stand-out brand, use these strategies plus any others that can help you broadcast your value effectively. Whatever tactics you choose, be sure they truly assist your job search and capture the attention of the right audience.

Mark Anthony Dyson is a career consultant, the host and producer of “The Voice of Job Seekers” podcast, and the founder of the blog by the same name.

SEE IT IN ACTION
Master the art of closing deals and making placements. Take our Recruiter Certification Program today. We’re SHRM certified. Learn at your own pace during this 12-week program. Access over 20 courses. Great for those who want to break into recruiting, or recruiters who want to further their career.
Like this article? We also offer tons of free eBooks on career and recruiting topics – check out Get a Better Job the Right Way and Why It Matters Who Does Your Recruiting.

First Day on the Job: Make a Great Impression Without Coming on Too Strong

cloud

It’s your first day on the job, and you want to make a great impression on your supervisor and coworkers.

This is an understandable urge, but you must be careful. You don’t want to come on too strong — like a person wearing so much perfume or cologne you can smell them before you see them. You don’t want to be that person, metaphorically — and literally! — speaking.

The following tips will help you strike the right balance between being impressive and being arrogant on your first day at your new job. You don’t want to give anyone a reason to regret hiring you.

1. Dress to Impress

Consult your employee handbook for the office dress code. Your first day is not the time to push the limit or see what you can get away with! Dress professionally, per your industry standard and in compliance with the company’s policy. If you do not know what the dress code is and/or have not received a handbook yet, contact the HR department for clarification.

2. Maintain a Humble Attitude

Do not alienate yourself on the first day. You’re not too smart for the room. Do not be a know-it-all. Do not say things like, “At my old job, we did it this way.” You don’t want to imply your way of doing things is better and everyone else is wrong.

Instead, be willing to learn. Yes, you were hired to contribute your expertise, but you must take some time to learn how the company operates — and why it operates that way — before you can start to offer suggestions. Establish rapport with your colleagues and do your homework. Once you’ve established yourself in the company, you can start talking about opportunities for improvement.

3. Be an Active Listener

You did your research before accepting this job; you know who the experts are in the company. Let them share their expertise with you.

Active listening requires you not only hear what others are saying, but also observe their body language to get a full understanding of their message. Listen to what people have to say without interrupting or pushing back. Be very cognizant of your own facial expressions and body language, too. If you notice negative or hostile body language from someone, check yourself to make sure you are not sending off your own negative vibes.

4. Take Notes

Show your employer you are eager to learn. Carry a notebook and pen everywhere to jot down notes about processes and policies, the names of people you meet and their departments, computer login instructions, etc. I recommend you carry a notebook instead of taking notes in your phone; you do not want anyone to get the impression you are scrolling through Facebook instead of paying attention.

5. Reflect

At the end of the day, review your notes and reflect on how the day went. You’re likely to feel both overwhelmed and excited at this moment, and that’s totally normal. Celebrate what went well and identify what you wish you had done differently. Make a list of any lingering questions you may have to ask your supervisor or research on your own.

The first day at a new job — heck, even the first year! — can be exhausting. There are a lot of ropes to learn and brand-new surroundings to get used to. Embrace the change and stay open to learning new things about your job, your company, and even yourself. And don’t forget to keep track of the new duties and skills you learn along the way so you can add them to your resume and LinkedIn profile!

Jaynine Howard is a military veteran whose work as a career strategist and reinvention specialist has been recognized by professional organizations throughout the nation.

Director Nursing, Emergency Room – TUCSON AZ $95,000 – $145,000

Job Description:

Accountable for all aspects of development, management, and financial success of a 40 Bed Emergency Department with approximately 80 staff.

 

The ED has approximately 45,000 visits per year with a 25% admission rate. The ED is on track for a Trauma level II designation next year.

 

Patients are very high acuity. The position has a Manager reporting to it with Clinical Leads (Supervisors) reporting to the Manager.

 

Develops and articulates mission and vision, develops business plan, financial and budget targets, and quality measures.

 

Responsible for contractual relationships with physicians and provider partners.

 

Develops plan to ensure outstanding customer/patient satisfaction.

 

 

Qualifications:

 

Required Education: Bachelor’s in Nursing, Healthcare, Business, Public Administration, Management or related field.

 

Required Experience: 5 years progressively responsible healthcare experience, 5 years progressively responsible management or business experience.  Includes management of department, revenue accountability, contract management and staff management.

 

Required Licensure: Current license as an RN in the state of Arizona

 

 

Skills

 

Required: Team building, systems thinking, complex problem solving, negotiating and influencing, change and conflict management, facilitation of quality improvement process, evaluation of quality information, coaching and mentoring, strategic planning, business strategy development, management of large and complex projects.

 

Knowledge

Required: Quality improvement principles, healthcare trends, business and management techniques and principles, strategic planning, business strategy development, large project management.  Regulatory requirements in healthcare field.

 

Technology

Required: Knowledge of current uses of technology in business and healthcare field.  Ability to use personal productivity tools (i.e.; Microsoft Office)

 

Any equivalent combination of education, training and/or experience that fulfills the requirements of the position will be considered.

 

 

IMPORTANT: All resumes must be submitted with a brief candidate summary that outlines the key qualifications required for this position as per the job description. Please be sure to showcase all skills and experience relevant to each requirement for THIS particular job. This write-up will be forwarded to the client along with the resume.

BENEFITS

Full

 

Email:  directrecruitmentteam@gmail.com

Clinical Nurse Manager Needed – PICU, Akron, Ohio – $79,498 – $124,582

JOB DESCRIPTION

Position Description:

  • Assesses, plans, implements, and evaluates delivery of patient care on assigned unit on 24-hour basis.
  • Provides direction to the development and evaluation of assigned nursing personnel.
  • Maintains operational aspects of the patient care unit in collaboration with support services.
  • Contributes to nursing and the Hospital through support of philosophy and objectives, educational efforts, and research efforts.

 

REQUIRED – Do not submit without these qualifications:

  • Master’s Degree required.
  • Minimum of 2 years of clinical experience in pediatrics with demonstrated management and leadership.
  • Experience in an adult or pediatric ICU.

 

IMPORTANT: All resumes must be submitted with a brief candidate summary that outlines the key qualifications required for this position as per the job description. Please be sure to showcase all skills and experience relevant to each requirement for THIS particular job. This write-up will be forwarded to the client along with the resume.

BENEFITS:  FULL

 

QUESTIONS FROM THE EMPLOYER

  • Does the candidate have the required Masters degree?
  • Do you have 2 to 5 years management experience?
  • Does the candidate have the REQUIRED Minimum of 2 years of clinical experience in pediatrics with demonstrated management and leadership? LIST DETAILS OF EXPERIENCE BELOW:
  • What experience does the candidate have with an adult or pediatric ICU? List details below:
  • You confirm that you have disclosed to your candidate that you are working with Recruiter.com on the position to avoid any confusion with candidates and clients. (required)

ADDITIONAL INFO

REQUIRED – Do not submit without these qualifications:

  • Master’s Degree required.
  • Minimum of 2 years of clinical experience in pediatrics with demonstrated management and leadership.
  • Experience in an adult or pediatric ICU.